Posts Tagged ‘cognitive decline’

Why Some People with Alzheimer’s Hallmarks Never Develop the Dementia

Studies Showed that the Hallmark Proteins of Alzheimer’s Did not Grow in the Synapses Neuroscientists have been intrigued by research that discovered people with classical Alzheimer’s hallmarks of beta amyloid protein plaques and tangles made up of tau protein in their brains who never developed Alzheimer’s disease. These are called Non-Demented with Alzheimer’s Neuropathology (NDAN).…

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Sleep may Have an Anti-oxidant Effect on the Brain and Body

Oxidative Stress Risk Factor for Neurodegenerative and Chronic Diseases Anti-oxidants found in foods and medicinal herbs have been linked to preventing diseases. Oxidation is a chemical process that leads to the production of free radicals which cause oxidative stress. For instance, LDL cholesterol is not at all dangerous until it is oxidized and then it…

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Skinny Fat in Seniors may be a way to Predict Dementia

What is Skinny Fat Skinny fat (sarcopenic obesity) is when a senior has skinny weak muscles, but a lot of fat that makes up their body mass. Low muscle mass and strength is usually from aging and this is called sarcopenia. However, according to a new study published June 6, 2018, in the journal Clinical…

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Metals and Alzheimer’s Disease

Metals Interact with Beta Amyloid Protein in Brains of Seniors with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) Over the years research has discovered that changes in the metabolism of biometals takes place in the brains of seniors with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and these biometals interact with the beta amyloid protein in their brains and this causes the beta…

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Study Shows Interaction between Herpes viruses and Alzheimer’s

Slow Viruses and Prion Diseases Researchers have long suspected that there might be a connection between Alzheimer’s disease and microbes like bacteria or viruses. In fact many studies have dealt with this issue beginning in 1952 when a study suggested that a slow virus form of herpes simplex could be the cause of Alzheimer’s disease.…

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Motor Decline in Parkinson’s Disease may be Prevented by a Form of Vitamin B3

Parkinson’s Disease Parkinson’s Disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease and to date no real cure has been found. According to the Parkinson’s Organization, about a million Americans have Parkinson’s disease and there are about 60,000 new cases every year. Parkinson’s causes tremors, a loss of coordination and balance, rigidity in…

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New Blood Test to Identify Risk for Alzheimer’s

News about a new blood test to discover who is at risk for Alzheimer’s disease years before the symptoms show up was published April 6, 2018, in EMBO Molecular Medicine. Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s disease causes the build up of amyloid plaques and tau tangles in the brain, which in turn cause the destruction of brain…

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A Saliva test to Predict who is at Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

Ibuprofen is not a Cure for Alzheimer’s Recent media headlines declaring that Ibuprofen could prevent Alzheimer’s disease appeared very quickly all around the world. Only a few of the articles bothered to explain that Ibuprofen is not a cure for Alzheimer’s, but if it is taken early enough, before the disease sets in, it may stop…

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Beets may be able to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

A compound called betanin found in beets Beta vulgaris, a common garden vegetable may be able to treat Alzheimer’s disease. The study published by the American Chemical Society was presented at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) on March 20, 2018 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Betanin Stopped Oxidation of…

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Green Leaf Vegetables may Prevent Cognitive Decline in Seniors

Eat those Greens! A study published January, 2018, in the Neurology Journal found that eating some kinds of vegetables with green leaves significantly prevented cognitive decline in seniors. In fact, those that ate the highest amount of greens were found to be 11 years cognitively younger than those who ate less. The study followed 960 seniors…

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